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CSD at NASCC 2018

CSD at NASCC 2018

Several CSD employees will be both attending and presenting at this year’s AISC’s NASCC: The Steel Conference from April 11, 2018 through April 13, 2018 at the Baltimore Convention Center in Baltimore, MD.


Steel Framed Stairway Design by Adam Friedman
Wednesday Morning N3a, Thursday Evening N3b

The New Certification Program Requirements and Standard: What Do They Mean for You? by Mike West
Wednesday Morning Q2

It Fits!! by Mike West
Wednesday Afternoon U6

Roof Design Using Iterative Analysis For Ponding Loads by Jim Fisher
Wednesday Afternoon N24a, Friday Morning N24b

Whats New in the 2017 AIST Tech Report #13 by Tim Bickel and John Rolfes
Wednesday Afternoon N23a, Friday Afternoon N23b


Jules Van de Pas will also be moderating several sessions throughout the conference.

Several other employees will also be in attendance at the conference.

Please let us know if you are planning on attending the conference or stop by to introduce yourself to one of our moderators or presenters.

The full excerpts of the presentations are below.


Steel Framed Stairway Design by Adam Friedman
Wednesday Morning N3a, Thursday Evening N3b

This session provides guidance for the design and layout of steel elements for steel framed stairways, guards, handrail and related components. Background information regarding stairways, code requirements,design methods, guard/handrail design, special considerations,delegated design and design examples will be presented.

Topics will include:

  • Common issues related to the design and construction of steel framed stairways
  • Understanding of stair types, members, and components
  • General overview of code requirements specific to stairways
  • Structural engineering for steel stairway members and connections
  • Delegated design considerations
  • Coordination between stair designer and architect, engineer of record, detailer, fabricator and erector

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The New Certification Program Requirements and Standard: What Do They Mean for You? by Mike West
Wednesday Morning Q2

This session will explore the new Certification Standard for Steel Fabrication and Erection, and Manufacturing of Metal Components (AISC 207-16). This Standard brings together provisions from the four individual predecessor standards relating to the four industry segments: steel building fabrication, steel bridge fabrication, steel erection, and metal component manufacturing. The goal of the new standard is to provide consistency and transparency across all industry programs. Also, AISC Certification will discuss the implementation process for fabrication and manufacturing participants, which will begin in 2018.

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It Fits!! by Mike West
Wednesday Afternoon U6

As the exclamation point in the presentation title indicates, “It Fits” is good news. A critical aspect of the design and construction of structural steel frames is the accommodation of follow on trades, including the structural steel frame as a follow on to the foundations and follow on trades to the frame such as the façade/curtain wall. The tolerances for the fabrication and erection listed in the AISC Code of Standard Practice are an essential element in this process, but other elements are also very important for success. These other elements are tolerance coordination among systems and adjustment at system interfaces. The presentation includes: Review of the AISC Code of Standard Practice and its general role in the design and construction process. Review of relevant provisions of the AISC Code of Standard Practice. Review of related documents published by AISC, e.g., the Steel Construction Manual, Design Guide 22 and Design Guide 33. Review of other notable codes and standards published by AAMA, ACI and PCI. Review of how adjustment provisions can be employed accommodate the work of follow on trades. Recommendations for specifications, e.g., Section 051200. Review an example of how the code was used to determine interface tolerances.

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Roof Design Using Iterative Analysis For Ponding Loads by Jim Fisher
Wednesday Afternoon N24a, Friday Morning N24b

In this session roof ponding requirements in the SJI 2015 Specifications, IBC 2015, ASCE 7-16, the International Plumbing Code (2015), FM Global and the AISC 2016 Specification are reviewed. The recently improved SJI Roof Bay Analysis Tool is also discussed. This tool assists the engineer in selecting the most economical joist bay configuration and now also determines the stability of the bay for roof ponding. The ponding analysis method implemented in the tool, in which loads are computed based on the deformed shape of the roof, are introduced and compared to traditional methods of assessment defined within the AISC Specification. Several analysis examples of roofs constructed with joists and Joist Girders are presented. The presentation also includes photographs of roof failures with discussion as to why the collapses occurred.

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Whats New in the 2017 AIST Tech Report #13 by Tim Bickel and John Rolfes
Wednesday Afternoon N23a, Friday Afternoon N23b

Building codes provide limited guidance on the design of industrial buildings, especially heavy industrial buildings with overhead crane runways. AIST Technical Report #13 – Guide for the Design and Construction of Mill Buildings exists to provide designers and contractors guidance on the unique design and construction considerations for these structures. In the first revision in over a decade, the guide has been updated to incorporate current Building Code provisions, updated design recommendations and additional information. This session will summarize the changes and provide guidance on how to use this document.

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